Lupus

What Is Lupus

Lupus in its strictest sense is a crippling and irreversible condition that ravages the body’s immune system. It is characterized by the antibodies antagonizing and killing the body’s own cells and tissues until the body can no longer fend off against infection. The overall result is a nasty combination of infection, rashes, swelling, and a suppressed immune system that leaves a person bedridden and very ill even after catching a cold. Lupus causes massive damage to the vital organs and systems of the body and an inflammatory response so huge that the patient ends up with rashes and swelling all over. According to research, women are more prone to having lupus than men.

Caucasians are among the races that have the lowest reported lupus causes. And since the disorder is hereditary and it’s passed on from one generation to another, no one can prevent its onset plus it’s an irreversible yet manageable disorder. There are many types of lupus noted in medical books, but here are some of the most common ones: discoid lupus erythematosus, systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE, lupus of neonatal origin, drug-induced lupus, and subcutaneous lupus erythematosus. Lupus gradually cause damages to the different systems of the body, and it slowly cripples a patient even if the cause of the complications is a simple infection. Unfortunately, there is no sure cure for the disorder. But the disease is manageable with a few changes in your lifestyle and compliance to medications as well.

There are people who can live a good and long life with lupus, because they know how to manage the complications of the disease in general. There are episodes of flare-ups and times when lupus is definitely at its worst. But with a few lifestyle changes, you’ll eventually be fine. Just don’t forget to consult with your doctor when needed and follow your prescribed treatment regimen.

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*Disclaimer: All information on this site is intended for entertainment purposes. This content is not guaranteed and results may vary person to person.